Home

Cretaceous–paleogene extinction event extinct species

Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction. The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction is also known by several names including Cretaceous-Tertiary, K-T extinction, or K-Pg extinction. It is probably the best-known global extinction event, popular for wiping out the dinosaurs. The K-Pg extinction was a sudden mass extinction that took place about 66 million years ago during the Mesozoic Era (252-66 million years ago), wiping out up to 75% of plants and animal species on the face of the Earth at the time The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event, also known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction, was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth that occurred over a geologically short period of time approximately 66 million years ago. With the exception of some ectothermic species like the leatherback sea turtle and crocodiles, no tetrapods weighing more than 25 kilograms (55 lb) survived It lasted approximately 79 million years, from the minor extinction event that closed the Jurassic Period about 145.5 million years ago to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event dated at..

K-T extinction, abbreviation of Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction, also called K-Pg extinction or Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction, a global extinction event responsible for eliminating approximately 80 percent of all species of animals at or very close to the boundary between the Cretaceous and Paleogene periods, about 66 million years ago Tyrannosaurus rex was among the many species of dinosaurs that went extinct as a result of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event. ©AMNH/C.Chesek In addition to its most famous victims, the non-avian dinosaurs, the K-Pg event caused the extinction of pterosaurs and extinguished many species of early mammals and a host of amphibians, birds. The Palaeocene species could represent either closely related species replacing extinct Cretaceous species or descendants of the Cretaceous species (Archibald & Bryant, 1990; Wilson, 2013). However, they occur very early in Pu1 (Renne et al ., 2013 ), probably within a few tens of thousands or even thousands of years after the extinction

Titanoboa cerrejonensis is an extinct genus of snakes that lived about 60–58 million years ago

Consequently, the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction that ended the Mesozoic is considered to have had little effect on squamate evolution (4, 6, 7). The K-Pg extinction represents one of the most severe mass extinctions in the history of life (8) The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event occurred 65 million years ago. In this extinction 17% of families, 50% of all genera, and 75% of all species became extinct. This extinction is believed to have been caused by an asteroid impact at the Chicxulub crater in the Yucatan plateau •The western North American (Laramidian) fossil record of the last 15 million years of the Cretaceous is the most complete in the run up to the extinction event; there are some losses of groups before the impact that seem to have been driven by other environmental factor

The Cretaceous-Palaeocene extinction was a mass extinction of huge proportions which brought an end to 50% of the world's species along with the dinosaurs in Earth's most famous mass extinction. It marks the end of the Mesozoic era in which the supercontinent Pangaea began separate into its individual landmasses Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, 66 million years ago, was a sudden mass extinction of three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth. With the exception of some ectothermic species such as the sea turtles and crocodilians, no tetrapods weighing more than 25 kilograms survived These patterns have been interpreted as the result of a mass extinction of archaic birds at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) (formerly Cretaceous-Tertiary, K-T) boundary and the subsequent adaptive radiation of surviving Neornithes in the Paleogene (3 ⇓ - 5) As a consequence of an asteroid impact, 66 Ma ago, the biosphere experienced a global extinction event so large that it defines the boundary between the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic eras (Alvarez et al., 1980, Alvarez, 1983, Renne et al., 2013).It is now over 30 years since the hypothesis of an asteroid impact forming the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary was advocated by Walter and Luis. Cretaceous-Tertiary Mass Extinction. Probably the best-known mass extinction event took out all the dinosaurs on Earth. This was the fifth mass extinction event, called the Cretaceous-Tertiary Mass Extinction, or K-T Extinction for short. Although the Permian Mass Extinction, also known as the Great Dying, was much larger in the number of species.

Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (End Cretaceous, K-Pg extinction, or formerly K-T extinction): 66 Ma at the Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) - Paleogene transition interval. The event formerly called the Cretaceous-Tertiary or K-T extinction or K-T boundary is now officially named the Cretaceous-Paleogene (or K-Pg) extinction event Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction - 66 million years ago The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event is the most recent mass extinction and the only one definitively connected to a major asteroid.. The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, which occurred approximately 65.5 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. Widely known as the K-T extinction event, it is associated with a geological signature known as the K-T boundary, usually a thin band of sedimentation found in various parts of the world. Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event: lt;p|>| ||| ||The |Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event|,|Template:Efn| formerly known as... World Heritage.

In the Izeh section (Zagros Basin, SW Iran), about two third of the planktonic foraminiferal species, representing less than 20% of the individuals, present in the Maastrichtian polytaxic assemblages, became suddenly extinct at the K/Pg boundary. This mass species extinction testifies end-Cretaceous catastrophic bioevent. The Cretaceous species remain became apparently extinct gradually during. The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event, was a sudden mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth, approximately 66 million years ago. With the exception of some ectothermic species such as the leatherback sea turtle and crocodiles, no tetrapods weighing more than 25 kilograms (55 lb) survived Over 60% of Cretaceous species became extinct, making the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) event the most recent of the big five mass extinctions (Raup and Sepkoski Reference Raup and Sepkoski 1982; Jablonski Reference Jablonski 2005; Schulte et al. Reference Schulte, Alegret, Arenillas, Arz, Barton, Bown, Bralower, Christeson, Claeys, Cockell, Collins, Deutsch, Goldin, Goto, Grajales-Nishimura, Grieve, Gulick, Johnson, Kiessling, Koeberl, Kring, MacLeod, Matsui, Melosh, Montanari, Morgan. The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, which most scientists now estimate was triggered by a massive asteroid impact, killed off not only the Earth's largest land-dwellers, but also massive..

In particular, the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event wiped out the pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, ornithischians, and sauropods, as well as many species of theropods, including troodontids, dromaeosaurids, tyrannosaurids, and abelisaurids, along with many Crocodyliformes, and squamates (e.g. mosasaurids). Reptile-Wikipedi At the same time, most plankton and many tropical invertebrates, especially reef-dwellers, became extinct, and many land plants were severely affected. This extinction event marks a major boundary in Earth's history, the K-T or Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, and the end of the Mesozoic Era The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event, [lower-alpha 1] also known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction, [lower-alpha 2] was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth—including all non-avian dinosaurs—that occurred over a geologically short period of time approximately 66 million years ago The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction occurred about 65.5 million years ago. It is also known as the K-T extinction event and its geological signature as the K-T boundary (K is the traditional abbreviation for the Cretaceous Period, to avoid confusion with the Carboniferous Period, abbreviated as C)

Timeline of Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event research and related information | Frankensaurus.com helping you find ideas, people, places and things to other similar topics GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History. •The disappearance of non-avian dinosaurs was just one part of a larger event: the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) mass extinction (formerly called the Cretaceous-Tertiary or K/T extinction). •Diverse groups of land and sea organisms died out at this time, 66 million years ago The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event oldearthcreationism Uncategorized February 9, 2018 February 9, 2018 2 Minutes I've been sifting the internet and asking others about how the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event-which occurred roughly 65.5 million years ago and wiped out at least 75 percent of all of Earth's species-would. Over 60% of Cretaceous species became extinct, making the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) event the most recent of the big five mass extinctions (Raup and Sepkoski 1982; Jablonski 2005; Schulte et al. 2010 ). Although the K/Pg event affected biotas globally, the severity of the extinction and the pacing of the recovery were geographically. The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary is marked by a major mass extinction, yet this event is thought to have had little effect on the diversity of lizards and snakes (Squamata). A revision of fossil squamates from the Maastrichtian and Paleocene of North America shows that lizards and snakes suffered a devastating mass extinction coinciding with the Chicxulub asteroid impact. Species.

The Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction Event - WorldAtla

Cretaceous - Paleogene Extinction Event Paleontology Worl

  1. der of the era
  2. The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary mass extinction, which occurred 66 million years ago, is the most recent and arguably the most famous of the big 5 mass extinctions which have taken place.
  3. The best-known mass extinction event is the Cretaceous Paleocene Extinction Event, in which all non-avian dinosaurs became extinct (along with many other animals and plants). You can find out more about the Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction Event on this page: When Did Dinosaurs Go Extinct
  4. ant land vertebrates; and in the seas it reduced the.
  5. Terrestrial Plants Flourished After the Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction . Compounds in ancient plant leaves tell the story of how an extinction event shaped our planet's ecosystems
  6. The Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event 66 million years ago eradicated three quarters of marine and terrestrial species globally. However, previous studies based on vertebrates suggest.
  7. Roughly 66 million years ago, an asteroid or comet struck the planet and wiped out three-quarters of every animal and plant species alive. Known as the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (K.

GEOL 104 FC Dinosaurs: A Natural History. Fall Semester 2011. The Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction: All Good Things... Definitions and Dramatis Personae. One of the most interesting aspects of dinosaur history is the extinction of the nonavian dinosaurs and the rise of mammals to dominance I know of no specific species of animal that is found on both sides of the K/T boundary, and only one (possible) genus, Peradectes. Peradectes was a marsupial found in North America and Europe during the very late Cretaceous Period, and we have so.. A big meteor impact could be an extinction level event. Marc Ward/Stocktrek Images, Getty Images. You may be surprised to learn the impact of an asteroid or meteor has only been connected with certainty to one mass extinction, the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event The date of the impact coincides precisely with the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (K-Pg boundary), slightly less than 66 million years ago, and a widely accepted theory is that worldwide climate disruption from the event was the cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, a mass extinction in which 75% of plant and animal species on Earth became extinct, including all non-avian.

K-T Extinction Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Graph of the rate of extinctions. Note the large spike at the end of the Cretaceous (labeled as K). Similar to the end of the Paleozoic era, the Mesozoic Era ended with the K-Pg Mass Extinction (previously known as the K-T Extinction) 66 million years ago [].This extinction event was likely caused by a large bolide (an extraterrestrial impactor such as. The Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction Event. It comes with no surprise, that the period ends with a mass extinction event. It is also well-known that it was caused by an asteroid. However, let's stop here for a moment. A massive body, 10 to 15 kilometers wide, a comet or an asteroid hit the planet The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, formerly named and still commonly referred to as the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, occurred approximately 65.5 million years ago at the end of the Maastrichtian age of the Cretaceous period. It was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. . Widely known as the K-T extinction event. The end-Cretaceous mass extinction ranks among the most severe extinctions of all time; however, patterns of extinction and recovery remain incompletely understood. In particular, it is unclear how severe the extinction was, how rapid the recovery was and how sampling biases might affect our understanding of these processes The normal loss of species through time is generally balanced by the rise of new species. Mass extinctions, however, disrupt this balance-representing times when many more species go extinct than are replaced by new ones. Scientists have found evidence of five mass extinction events during Earth's history

The Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary, (K-Pg) boundary, and the associated Dinosaur Extinc-tion theories have many precedents and most could be viewed scientifically from certain and known historical accounts. History of Earth shows that there are five major extinction events and the fifth extinction is the one that killed every dinosaur on the. found: Britannica online, May 6, 2020: K-T extinction (K-T extinction, mass extinction; abbreviation of Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction, also called K-Pg extinction or Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction; a global extinction event responsible for eliminating approximately 80 percent of all species of animals at or very close to the boundary between the Cretaceous and Paleogene periods, about 66. The best known mass extinction is the Cretaceous-Paleogene or K-Pg extinction, famous for ending the reign of the dinosaurs. This extinction can even be seen in the rock layers or strata of the earth where we see an abrupt loss of species from the fossil record around 66 million years ago, which also coincides with a unique sediment layer.

Cretaceous Period: Animals, Plants & Extinction Event

K-T extinction, abbreviation of Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction, also called K-Pg extinction or Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction, a global extinction event responsible for eliminating approximately 80 percent of all species of animals at or very close to the boundary between the Cretaceous and Paleogene periods, about 66 Extinction occurs at an uneven rate. The most recent and debatably best-known, the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, which occurred approximately 66 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period o The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction occurred about 65.5 million years ago. It is also known as the K-T extinction event and its geological signature as the K-T boundary (K is the traditional abbreviation for the Cretaceous Period, to avoid confusion with the Carboniferous Period, abbreviated as C). Since the label Tertiary is no longer recognized by most geologists (for example, the. The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, during which the non-avian dinosaurs became extinct, is the most well-known, but the earlier Permian-Triassic extinction event was even more severe, with approximately 96% of all marine species driven to extinction

6 Mass Extinctions in the History of EarthDinosaur Extinction Event Research Helps Explain Why Some Species Survived

K-T extinction Overview & Facts Britannic

The term extinction refers to an occurrence, wherein a particular biological species and/or the entire taxonomic group disappears from the face of the Earth. According to scientists, about 98% of the documented biological species are now extinct. This means that extinction of species, just like speciation (process of formation of new biological species), plays a rather prominent role in. Introduction. The end-Cretaceous mass extinction, resulting from an asteroid impact in the Yucatán at 65.5 Ma, was the most recent great catastrophe for life on Earth -.Land plants may have been less affected than animals, but the only region with abundant, high-resolution stratigraphic data remains the Western Interior USA, relatively close to the Chicxulub crater Some 65 million years ago, a 10-km-wide asteroid crashed into Earth near what is today Mexico. It triggered a mass extinction. Nearly 75 percent of life — including non-avian dinosaurs and large.

50 Critical Extinction Facts To Know Before It's Too Late

Six Extinctions: An Overview of the Ends of Species AMN

Cretaceous Mass Extinction Definition. The Cretaceous mass extinction was happened about 66 million years ago. This event wiped out around three-fourth of all species that were present on the earth. This was the period in which the dinosaurs become extinct except birds called the non-avian dinosaurs. Most of the vertebrates such as flying. Perhaps the most well-known of the Big 5, the end of the Cretaceous-Paleogene brought on the extinction of dinosaurs. A combination of volcanic activity, asteroid impact, and climate change effectively ended 76% of life on earth 65 million years ago. This extinction period allowed for the evolution of mammals on land and sharks in the sea The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time, approximately 66 million years ago (Ma) The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time, approximately 66 million years ago (Ma). It is widely known as the K-T extinction event and is associated with a geological signature, usually a thin band dated to that time and found in various parts of the world, known as the Cretaceous.

Severe extinction and rapid recovery of mammals across the

Michael Anissimov The Stellar Sea Cow, which has gone extinct, was a relative of the manatee. The Holocene extinction event is a term used to refer to the ongoing extinction of numerous animal species due to human activities. It is named after the geologic period of the Holocene, which began 11,550 years ago (about 9600 BC) and continues to the present The end-Cretaceous extinction is best known of the Big Five because it was the end of all dinosaurs except birds (the non-avian dinosaurs).It also created opportunities for mammals. During the Mesozoic Era dinosaurs dominated all habitats on land. Mammals remained small, mostly mouse to shrew-sized animals and some paleontologists have speculated that they might have been nocturnal to. Little did the animals of the Cretaceous Period know that approaching from the dark depths of space was an asteroid that would spell the end not just of the dinosaurs, but of 75% of all species. The Cretaceous - Paleogene Extinction Event occurred 66 million years ago. It brought the Cretaceous Period to a close, and led to a new chapter for.

Mass extinction of lizards and snakes at the Cretaceous

Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction: About 65 mya, the most recent event - wiping out non- avian Dinosaurs and extinguished many species of early mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and insects The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event,also known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction,was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth that occurred over a geologically short period of time, approximately 65 million years ago It's most likely that the only reason we modern apes, the rest of our primate cousins, and all other new species of life exist today is because of the meteor that crashed into earth approximately 66 millions years ago and wiped out the dinosaurs, causing what's known as the Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction Event.. Think about it: if that meteor never hits earth and the dinosaurs never.

Fifth Mass Extinction: Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction Even

The effect of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) (formerly Cretaceous-Tertiary, K-T) mass extinction on avian evolution is debated, primarily because of the poor fossil record of Late Cretaceous birds. In particular, it remains unclear whether archaic birds became extinct gradually over the course of the Cretaceous or whether they remained diverse up to the end of the Cretaceous and perished. 66 Million Years Ago: Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction The most recent mass extinction event is also likely the best understood of the Big Five. Is mass extinction inevitable? Scientists agree that there have been five mass extinctions in the past 600 million years (1) The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary is marked by a major mass extinction, yet this event is thought to have had little effect on the diversity of lizards and snakes (Squamata). A revision of fossil squamates from the Maastrichtian and Paleocene of North America shows that lizards and snakes suffered a devastating mass extinction. The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, which occurred approximately 65.5 million years ago (Ma), was a large-scale mass extinction of animal and plant species in a geologically short period of time. Widely known as the K-T extinction event, it is associated with a geological signature known as the K-T boundary, usually a thin band of. duration of the Paleogene extinction events. The aim of this review paper is to analyze the extinction events of the Cretaceous/Paleogene, Paleocene/Eocene, Middle-Late Eocene and Eocene/Oligocene, evalu-ating the magnitude of each event, its causes, extinction patterns, and survival strategies of planktic and smaller benthic foraminifera

Ammolite - Gem Quality Ammonite Fossil Fragment | Mini MuseumDromaeosaurus | Extinct Animals

GEOL 104 The Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction: All Good

The Great Oxygenation Event was probably the first major extinction event.[citation needed] Since the Cambrian explosion five further major mass extinctions have significantly exceeded the background extinction rate. The most recent and arguably best-known, the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, which occurred approximately 66 million. Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction even t(End Cretaceous, K-Pg extinction, or formerly K-T extinction) event. About 17% of all families, 50% of algl enera and 75% of all species became extinct. In the seas all the ammonites, plesiosaurs and mosasaurs disappeared and the percentage ofs essile animals (those unable to move about) was reduced.

What If The Titanoboa Snake Didn't Go Extinct

Cretaceous - Paleogene extinction - Evolutionary Radiatio

The causes of the end-Cretaceous extinction event are the ones that are best understood. It was during this extinction event about 65 million years ago that the dinosaurs, the dominant vertebrate group for millions of years, disappeared from the planet (with the exception of a theropod clade that gave rise to birds) The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event, also known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction, was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth that occurred over a geologically short period of time approximately 66 million years ago

TEOTWAWKI - The End Of The World As We Know It - Ask a Prepper

Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event - Shortpedia

Iridium layer at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary-Iridium not usually found on Earth; cones from meteorites Ejecta layer was composed of materials blasted from the crater Cretaceous- Paleogene (Tertiary) boundary 65 million years ago-Global biotic collapse-90% of plankton foraminifera extinct-50% of reptile families (all dinos 65 million years ago (Ma) — at the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition (the K/T or Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event) about 17% of all families and 50% of all genera went extinct. (75% species). It ended the reign of dinosaurs and opened the way for mammals and birds to become the dominant land vertebrates Earlier, I talked about the small early mammals that co-existed with dinosaurs - it turns out that although mammals also experienced some extinctions some of them survived the End Cretaceous extinction event - and from these surviving taxa, over 130 new genera comprising 4 000 different species radiated afterwards during the Palaeogene

Mass extinction of birds at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg

The Triassic-Jurassic extinction event; about 201 million years ago, which killed half the species on Earth at the time and ushered in the age of the dinosaurs; and The Cretaceous-Paleogene , the asteroid, volcano and climate change-caused extinction event which brought us from the dinosaur age to our current Cenozoic Age, also known as the. the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (K-Pg extinction, 66 Mya) and the Eocence-Oligocene extinction event (33.9 Mya). The fossil records shows signi cantly higher historical diversity with a peak in Jurassic compared to the diversity of extant crocodilians (Bronzati et al. 2015). Previous studies have found evidence for the Triassic. The Cretaceous Period ended with a devastating extinction event. The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (also known as the K-Pg extinction event) saw the extinction not only of all of the non-avian dinosaurs, but also of the pterosaurs, the plesiosaurs, and countless other species Examining the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event Over 98% of all organisms that have lived on Earth are now extinct. A mass extinction event occurs when a large number of species die out within a small time frame (relative to the age of Earth). Mass extinctions are intensively studied for both cause and effect, as there is usually room for. The analysis showed a higher diversity of leaf forms in the Paleogene, which surprised the researchers given the high species-level extinction and drop in number of species at the end of the.

Titanoboa Wallpaper for Android - APK Download

This extinction of a larger number of animals together is called as the mass extinction. As the new species start to evolve, the older species tend to get depleted from the surface of the earth. More than 90% of the total available species are known to have gone extinct in the past 500 million years. Mass extinctions are known to be deadly events Author Massimo Sandal Posted on March 8, 2021 March 8, 2021 Categories Cretaceous-Paleogene, General, Permian-Triassic, Present extinction Tags butterflies, carolina parakeet, chicxulub, cretaceous, deccan traps, great auk, impact, insect extinction, karoo basin, kt event, mass extinctions, permian, singapore Leave a comment on Blood of birds. Sharks may have been spared a global extinction event millions of years ago that wiped out several species, including all large marine reptiles like mosasaurs and non-avian dinosaurs, according to a new study. Scientists, including those from Sweden's Uppsala University, have shed light on how the dinosaur-killing extinction event transformed ecosystems and the kinds of [ This fateful day marked the Cretaceous extinction event, making way for a new geological period, the Paleogene. As soon as the terrible impact befell the ancient Earth, the fate of around three quarters of all plant and animal species was already sealed Birds today are the most diverse clade of terrestrial vertebrates, and understanding why extant birds (Aves) alone among dinosaurs survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction is crucial to reconstructing the history of life. Hypotheses proposed to explain this pattern demand identification of traits unique to Aves. However, this identification is complicated by a lack of data from non.